MIES VAN DER ROHE
MIES VAN DER ROHE

Van der Rohe was na Architect born in Aachen, Germany. As an architect and designer in Berlin, influenced modern architecture. With innovative designs for tubular steel furniture, such as the Barcelona Chair (1929) and steel and glass skyscrapers. He directed the Bauhaus in Dessau (1930-33), which closed after Nazi threats. Even though he had built only nineteen buildings so far, he was already internationally recognized when he moved out to the US in 1937. In America, he founded and directed the Department of Architecture of the Armour Institute, Chicago (later Illinois Institute of Technology) (1938-58) and he designed the master plan of the Institute and some buildings on the campus.

He celebrated contemporary technology and different materials.  Under his influence, there was a paradigmatic change in the construction of skyscrapers, moving away from masonry to the metal and glass. According to his credo that “less is more”, his buildings were characterized by the affordable, simple designs, devoid of ornaments and for the presence of more open spaces compounds rather than buildings.

As one of the founders international style, his influence on the architecture of the twentieth century cannot be overlooked. His striking and simple German Pavilion at the Barcelona International Exhibition (1929) crystallized public acceptance for modern architecture. His buildings include the glass flats of Lake Shore Drive in Chicago (1948-51), the Seagran Building in New York (1956-58, together with Philip Johnson), and the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston (1958-73).


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